INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RESOURCE EFFICIENCY

IN THE CONTEXT OF THE G20 RESOURCE EFFICIENCY DIALOGUE, ESTABLISHED BY THE G20 COUNTRIES

AT THE G20 SUMMIT IN HAMBURG, ON JULY 7-8, 2017

AND TO BE OFFICIALLY LAUNCHED IN BERLIN, ON NOVEMBER 27-28, 2017

HIGH-LEVEL BUSINESS POLICY DIALOGUE HOSTED BY

the CONFEDERATION OF INDIAN INDUSTRY (CII) and the GLOBAL BUSINESS COALITION (GBC)

New Delhi, November 02, 2017 from 9:30 am to 5 pm



ABOUT THE EVENT

With the rise in global population, the consumption of natural resources has drastically increased.

Human societies today extract and use around 50 per cent more natural resources than they did 30 years ago, at about 60 billion tonnes of raw materials a year.

The present unsustainable global patterns of natural resource consumption indicate that in the future the earth’s natural resources will be used up faster than their rate of replenishment.

Meeting the demand for natural resources in a sustainable way is one of the biggest challenges of our time; present trends are forcing societies to reconsider the way they produce and consume.

As such, industry and business are key solution providers for enabling consumers to meet their economic needs while working towards making our economies more resource efficient and circular.

The Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), one of the leading Industry associations of India, along with the Global Business Coalition (GBC), the international coalition of independent business associations from the major world economies, are conjointly organizing a one-day conference on how India can reshape its policy framework and business ecosystems, with the objective to mainstream Resource Efficiency into its economy.

This event is part of GBC’s engagement process of informing the G20 policy-makers of the forward trends within industries, with the perspective of supporting the development of an integrated international policy framework, that benefits from good practices and experiences of how businesses can promote resource efficiency activities globally.

GBC’s latest initiative on RE can be consulted here

TENTATIVE AGENDA

Session I – Opening Plenary

Session II – Resource Efficiency & Circular Economy: Enabler for Low Carbon Economy

Climate Change has started impacting most of the global economies in the form of natural disasters and extreme climatic patterns. To address this global challenge, the COP-21 in Paris has been able to bring together 197 countries committing reduction in their greenhouse gas emissions. These commitments or Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) focus on emission reduction measures, and improving energy efficiency is one of them.

It has been established that over half of the worldwide greenhouse gas emissions are associated with the production of basic materials required for human consumption across the globe. Therefore, countries need to reshape their business ecosystem in such a way that RE & CE can be integrated into mainstream business planning of industries. The concept of RE & CE has the potential to provide practical and scalable opportunities to leapfrog from unsustainable resource consumption patterns of present time.

To provide an enabling business environment, the right set of policies need to be framed so as to incentivise resource efficiency, bring-up the innovation culture and facilitate creating markets for sustainable and resource efficient products.

  • Charting out low carbon growth for creating a business ecosystem for resource efficient products.
  • Promotion of sustainable procurement, which would help in creating market pull for resource efficient and secondary raw material products.
  • Role of technology to enable archiving and retrieval of information about various waste streams in the country and providing a digital and free market for secondary resource exchange.
  • Experience sharing on implementation and acceleration of circular economy and resource efficiency in the developed economies.

Session III – Anchor Industries: Driving Sustainability in Value Chain

Today, India stands at the threshold of profound choices for making its growth sustainable following a low carbon pathway, and can look beyond the linear ‘take, make and dispose’ model. With its young population and emerging manufacturing sector, the country can make systemic choices that would put it on a trajectory towards positive, regenerative, and value creating development.

Industry plays a critical role while a nation charts out its strategy for a sustainable growth. It provides solutions to environmental and societal challenges by designing sustainable products and services. Key focus areas for the Industry to drive sustainability in its supply chain are enhancing resource efficiency, introducing responsible products and mitigating the impacts on environment.

Although Micro Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs) are the backbone of any economy, the anchor industry has a greater responsibility to drive sustainability in their value chain, which mostly comprises ancillary units being part of the MSME sector.

  • The role of Indian Industry in waste value chain to make it more usable/valuable for the purpose of re-manufacturing.
  • The role of Anchor Indian Industry to increase capabilities of MSMEs involved in value chain, to adopt sustainable production practices.
  • How Indian Anchor Industries can contribute to increase awareness among relevant stakeholders – on the concepts of Sustainable Production and Consumption.
  • Challenges or barriers being faced by Indian Industry while moving towards circular economy.
  • The best practices adopted by leading companies across the globe to embed the concept of Circular Economy.

Session IV – Start-ups & Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs): Closing the loops of Circular Economy

Over last decade, solid waste management has emerged as a massive challenge for developing countries. Innovative business models, which are based on resource recovery and recycling would be the key to utilise the aforesaid challenge and an opportunity and close the resource recycling loops for a circular economy. Indian Industry needs to look beyond the linear model and the emerging concept of ‘Circular Economy’ can help to find possible solutions.

‘Start-up India’ (about 19,000 start-ups in India by the end of the year 2016), one of the Government of India’s flagship initiative to build Start-ups and nurture innovation can play a significant role for the purpose. However, lack of financial resources, shortage of technical and skills manpower along with absence of right market place is preventing growth of SMEs and Start-ups in the domain of resource recovery and recycling.

There is a need to provide an ecosystem that will encourage Indian SMEs sector and Start-ups to make systematic choices that will encourage them to move towards more positive, regenerative and value creating business.

  • The role of the Federal Government of India and Indian Industry – especially start-ups and SME sector – in catalysing and accelerating transition towards circular economy.

Session V – Closing remarks